Production The Film Business

Eye Shapes in Makeup Artistry

Understanding the portions of the face and body will lead you to the art of makeup. Mastering the proportions of the face will enable you to create and design any look.

In the well-known Muller-Lyer Illusion, a straight line with flanges pointed outward seems longer than the one with them turned inward. The one tugs the attention beyond the line and seems to lengthen it, the other pulls it center and shortens it. Makeup Artists exploit this effect. For instance, by daubing shadow above the outer ends of the eyes, they draw them further apart. By applying it above the inner corners, they narrow them. (McNeill, 297)

A Makeup Artist will use this principle to compose features that are necessary for the character or beauty makeup. In all areas of makeup, you need to trick the mind as to what is being seen (Figure 1.15).

film business

FIGURE 1.15: MULLER-LYER ILLUSION

Everyone has their own unique facial features and characteristics. As in drawing, where you place a shadow or highlight represents what you are visually saying about your makeup. In anatomy, the placement of the skeletal and muscle systems in each individual highlights those unique features.

Eyes can be categorized into six basic shapes:

eye shape

FIGURE 1.21: EVEN/BALANCED EYE

Even-Set, or Balanced, Eyes: Equals one eye length apart (Figure 1.21). This is the eye shape that is considered the “perfect” one aesthetically. You can do almost anything with the evenset eye, and not be concerned with corrective makeup.

Wide-Set Eyes: Are spaced farther apart than the length of the eye (Figure 1.22). To bring the eyes closer together, place a dark color on the inside inner corner of the eye.

film business

FIGURE 1.22: WIDE SET WITH DARK COLOR APPLIED

Deep-Set Eyes: Are recessed farther into the eye socket (Figure 1.23). To bring them out, place a lighter-colored shadow on the upper lids. Use medium rather than dark colors in the eye crease. Less is more with this eye shape.

film business

FIGURE 1.23: DEEP SET WITH LIGHT COLOR APPLIED

Large Eyes: Will in some cases need to look smaller (Figure 1.24). A large eye conveys surprise and/or shock, which we will cover later in our discussion of facial expression. To make the eye appear smaller, use dark colors on the eyelid and eye crease.

jobs in film

FIGURE 1.24: LARGE EYE WITH EXAMPLE OF MAKING IT SMALLER

Round Eyes: Can handle most colors (Figure 1.25). The eyeliner will need to be adjusted if you have to make the eye look more almond-shaped. Place eye-shadow color on the eyelid, blending up at the outside corners. You can also place a dark color on the outer top corner.

jobs in film

FIGURE 1.25: ROUND EYE WITH COLOR

Small Eyes: Need light-colored shadow to open them up (Figure 1.26). Dark colors will only make them smaller. To give the illusion of a larger eye, use a light color on the eyelid, and medium color in the eye crease. Again, less is more.

jobs in film business

FIGURE 1.26: SMALL EYE WITH COLOR

Excerpted from The Makeup Artist Handbook 2e by Gretchen Davis & Mindy Hall ©2012 Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved

Related posts:

1 Comment
   peter cawthorne said on May 9, 2012 at 1:51 pm

This is very useful. As a company which creates animation software, I think that having basic examples like this is wonderful.

Tell us what you think!
*

Latest Tweets

Stay Informed

Click here to register with Focal Press to receive updates.


about MasteringFilm

MasteringFilm, powered by bestselling Routledge authors and industry experts, features tips, advice, articles, video tutorials, interviews, and other resources for aspiring and current filmmakers. No matter what your filmmaking interest is, including directing, screenwriting, postproduction, cinematography, producing, or the film business, MasteringFilm has you covered. You’ll learn from professionals at the forefront of filmmaking, allowing you to take your skills to the next level.